Whooping cough is on the rise in Logan County


County Health District encourages vaccinations

Submitted story



Cases of whooping cough (also called pertussis) are on the rise in our community. As of Feb. 27, there have been four cases of whooping cough in Logan County.

Know the signs of whooping cough

Whooping cough vaccines work well, but cannot prevent all cases of this serious disease. Whooping cough starts like the common cold, with a runny nose or congestion, sneezing, a mild cough, or fever. But after 1 to 2 weeks, severe coughing can begin.

Unlike the common cold, whooping cough can become a series of violent and rapid coughing fits that continue for weeks. These coughing fits force all of the air out of the lungs. People can make a loud “whooping” sound when they are finally able to breathe again. That sound is how whooping cough got its name. However, it is important to know that many babies with whooping cough don’t cough at all.

If you or your child develops a cold that includes a lengthy or severe cough, it may be whooping cough. The best way to know is to see your doctor.

Whooping cough is a serious disease that can cause violent coughing fits lasting up to 10 weeks or more. It can be quite severe, even deadly, especially for babies under 6 months old, who are too young to be well protected by vaccines. The disease starts out like a cold, and it spreads easily. Babies often catch whooping cough from parents, siblings, and other caregivers, who may not even know they are sick. Help protect the babies in our community against whooping cough.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends that all preteens, teens and adults – including pregnant women – get a vaccine called Tdap. By vaccinating adults and young people in our community, we can surround our babies with protection. Babies and young children also need their own vaccines against whooping cough—called DTaP. Be sure to get your children vaccinated on time against whooping cough according to CDC’s recommended immunization schedule. To learn more about whooping cough and the vaccines to prevent it, visit www.cdc.gov/whoopingcough or talk to your health care professional.

Logan County Health District Has vaccine available – please call to register at 937-651-6186. Immunization Clinics are held every Thursday Morning 9:00–11:00 a.m. and the 1st Thursday of each month 2:00 – 6:00 p.m

County Health District encourages vaccinations

Submitted story

Submitted by the Logan County Health District.

Submitted by the Logan County Health District.